Hi. I'm an English Major. I'm not too good with grammar. You may know me as the author of.
I'm gonna try to write on here more often. The End (?)
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Reblogged from oceansoftheworld  1,464 notes

the-shark-blog:

The earliest sharks date from more than 420 million years ago, before the time of the dinosaurs! The 400 species of modern sharks have evolved in various ways and scientists have classified them into the 8 major groups shown in this graphic. See how sharks fit into this family tree, from the most well-known sharks like the great white and tiger sharks, to the bizarre lesser-known sharks like the frilled shark, goblin shark and cookiecutter shark.”

Joseph // Source

Reblogged from radicalchuu  25,331 notes
malformalady:

Yili Apricot Valley, China. Every year, these rolling hills in Xinjiang explode into a puffy sea of pink and white. As the largest groves of apricots in the region, this flowering signifies the beginning of the fruiting season, while also transforming the landscape into something other-worldly.

malformalady:

Yili Apricot Valley, China. Every year, these rolling hills in Xinjiang explode into a puffy sea of pink and white. As the largest groves of apricots in the region, this flowering signifies the beginning of the fruiting season, while also transforming the landscape into something other-worldly.

Reblogged from historical-nonfiction  590 notes

Very Funny, JFK

historical-nonfiction:

In 1961, New York Post columnist Leonard Lyons contacted John F. Kennedy after seeing Presidential autographs for sale in a store and informed him of the prices. At the time, George Washington’s was priced at $175, Ulysses S. Grant’s at $55, Franklin D. Roosevelt’s at $75, Teddy Roosevelt’s at $67.50, and JFK’s at $75. Below is the response mailed to Lyons.

Reblogged from iguanamouth  4,088 notes

endangereduglythings:

whatthefauna:

The sawfish uses its long, toothed rostrum not for killing, but for immobilizing. Also known as the carpenter shark, its nose is covered in electrosensitive pores that detect small movements in the water. When it detects food nearby, the shark slashes its nose through the water to stun prey long enough to gobble it up.

Image credit: Elyse Booth

The rostrum is a lot more maneuverable than I thought. Look at it juggle that fish into its mouth.

Reblogged from mazda787b  10,610 notes